Archives for December 2015

USING CLICKERS IN SPRING 2016?

turningpoint_cloud_logo_200wIf you are planning to use clickers in SPRING 2016, please visit the clicker registration page (linked below) to register your classes by FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2015.

https://itweb.mst.edu/auth-cgi-bin/cgiwrap/clickers/request_clickers.pl

This information helps EdTech prepare the classrooms for clicker technology. The S&T Store also needs to have a rough estimate of how many Turning Account licenses and clickers should be available for Spring 2016.

If you haven’t used clickers before and would like more information, please contact Educational Technology at edtech@mst.edu or 573-341-4131.

Thanks for your assistance!

TEGRITY Courses Purged at End of Semester – FS 2015

IMPORTANT! Please read the following message VERY carefully!

Educational Technology (EdTech) will be purging ALL course sessions stored in Tegrity at close of business on Friday, January 8, 2016.

Missouri S&T’s usage agreement with Tegrity limits us to only 500 hours of recordings per semester. This means we MUST remove all recordings from Tegrity at the end of each semester in order to ensure we have enough space available for recordings in the next semester.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU:

If you used Tegrity lecture capture to record your class sessions, those recordings will be removed permanently from Tegrity’s servers. This includes any recordings in your private course. All Tegrity users are given a private course in addition to their regular courses (listed as “<NAME> Private Course” in the course list inside of Tegrity).

Due to changes in Tegrity, it is no longer a relatively simple process to download recordings for backups! Instead, the current process is very time and labor intensive as the downloaded video recordings are stored in a VERY non-intuitive location and are NOT labeled with a proper recording name–it’s just a random hash of characters.

For this reason, we STRONGLY encourage contacting EdTech for assistance if you need to maintain a copy of your video recordings–we can also help convert those recordings to Kaltura-compatible format so you can then add them to a course as a streaming video file later

NOTE: In previous semesters, it was possible for instructors and students to “subscribe” to a Tegrity recording as a podcast through iTunes. The current version of Tegrity is apparently having difficulty interfacing properly with the most recent versions of iTunes. This means that iTunes no longer downloads the Tegrity recordings properly.

Any instructor who would like assistance in backing up their Tegrity recordings is strongly encouraged to contact the Help Desk at 573-341-HELP or online at help.mst.edu. EdTech will be glad to provide that assistance.

More information about Tegrity lecture capture can be found at:

http://edtech.mst.edu/support/tegrity/

Will You Be Using Tegrity Lecture Capture for SPRING 2016?

Do you plan to use Tegrity lecture capture during SPRING 2016?

If so, then Educational Technology will need to gather some basic information from you so that we may prepare any room(s) in which you will be teaching with the appropriate technology.

To gather that information, we ask that you complete the survey linked below:

Tegrity Lecture Capture Information Survey
(This survey will expire at midnight on Thursday, December 31, 2015)

This survey will ask you in which rooms you will be teaching and will also ask which technology (audio or video) that you will need. NOTE: Several rooms are already equipped with Tegrity technology.

If you want to find out more information about Tegrity, please visit the EdTech web page below:

http://edtech.mst.edu/support/tegrity

For assistance with Tegrity-related issues, please contact the IT Help Desk at 573-341-HELP or online at help.mst.edu.

Teaching and Learning Technology Conference 2016 – REGISTRATION OPEN!

TLT-2016-header-RegistrationRegistration for the Teaching and Learning Technology Conference 2016 on March 17 and 18, 2016 is now OPEN!

THEME: Learning to Learn

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Web-based registration is now available at:

http://tlt.mst.edu/registration/

Registration for this event is FREE for all participants!

Details about our conference can be found on the conference web site:

http://tlt.mst.edu

We look forward to seeing you at our conference in March!

Using Someone Else’s Ideas and Thoughts Without Citation…Isn’t Right

Currently, one of the hot topics on our campus is Academic Integrity.  If you look at the Office of Undergraduate Studies website you will find many resources telling students what constitutes Academic Integrity, and what the consequences are when students cross the line.  51% of the issues reported last year appear to be about a specific form of academic dishonestly known as plagiarism.

On our campus, plagiarism is defined by the UM Collected Rules and Regulations (200.010 – http://www.umsystem.edu/ums/rules/collected_rules/programs/ch200/200.010_standard_of_conduct) as “The term plagiarism includes, but is not limited to: (i) use by paraphrase or direct quotation of the published or unpublished work of another person without fully and properly crediting the author with footnotes, citations or bibliographical reference; (ii) unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials; or (iii) unacknowledged use of original work/material that has been produced through collaboration with others without release in writing from collaborators.”

Missouri S&T is very strict with our students, and the university has set up sanctions for these actions depending on their severity. But what about when plagiarism happens in “real life?” Are there consequences? In short, yes—and they’re often far more serious and long-lasting than a simple failing grade. In “real life”, plagiarism can result in a loss of trust and professional status, which can have a very real impact on one’s livelihood. Even in cases of unintentional plagiarism the process to correct a non-citation can be long and painful. I recently talked with an instructor on our campus who had just gone through an experience where her work had been co-opted by another author.

Dr. Kate Sheppard is an instructor on our campus for the History and Political Science department.  She works hard as an instructor and a researcher.  She is always working to know about her area of specialization and interest so that she can continue to publish papers, give talks and write her next book.  She was excited when she found what she thought was a new article on Margaret Murray.  She was shocked when she realized that there was nothing new in this article but that the author had taken Dr. Sheppard’s own book and other papers and put them in a condensed form in this article.  It’s not word- for-word copying but if you look at our definition of plagiarism, isn’t that what this author did?

Technology makes our lives easier every day and it is incredibly easy to find the authors of papers and books today, many of whom are very happy to collaborate with you and help further the academic pursuit of a topic that they may be very passionate about.  Instead, Dr. Sheppard spent many hours trying to clear this issue up.  All she wanted was credit for her thoughts and ideas.  Here is a link to her original blog post about what happened to her. https://doctorkate.wordpress.com/2015/11/02/the-forgotten-citations-and-the-third-wave-feminist-and-scholar-who-really-wrote-them/

Dr. Sheppard was able to work with the publisher to get the issue resolved. The publisher edited the online article to give credit to Dr. Sheppard where it was due. That’s what Dr. Sheppard had asked for along.  Here is Dr. Sheppard’s update on this issue. https://doctorkate.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/the-forgotten-citations-a-resolution-from-broadlyvice/

When we are working with students and colleagues we need to let them know that plagiarism—even unintentional plagiarism—is wrong. Unless otherwise stated, thoughts, ideas, conclusions based on research belong to the person who did the work and we should honor that with the correct citations.  Give credit where it is due.

Written in collaboration with Raz Kerwin.