Search Results for: connect

Instructors: S&T connect is now used for sending Academic Alerts

S&T Connect is the new system for sending out Academic Alerts. Instead of sending out an “Alert”, you “Raise a Flag.” As before, challenged students and their academic advisors will receive a copy of your communication so that corrective actions can be identified and taken.

Here’s a quick visual tutorial to help you start using the S&T connect system.

1. Access S&T connect via the Blackboard top navigation bar.

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2. Click the “Students” tab:

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3. If you teach multiple sections, choose the desired section from the drop down list.

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4. Place a checkmark next to the challenged student’s name and click the “Flag” button:

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5. Select the appropriate type of Flag, fill in the details, and click “Save.”

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That’s it!
S&T connect is your one-stop-shop for communication with challenged students and their academic advisors. For more detailed support, contact Rachel Morris in the Office of Undergraduate Studies at (573) 341-7276

S&Tconnect Early Alert Workshops offered by Undergraduate Studies on August 18 and 21

The Office of Undergraduate Studies will be hosting workshops for the new S&Tconnect Early Alert system on Monday, August 18, from 9 – 11 a.m. and on Thursday, August 21, from 1 – 3 p.m. Both workshops will be held in Centennial Hall Room 105. Instructors only need to attend one of the workshops.

S&Tconnect Early Alert allows students to request appointments with their instructors and advisors via the S&Tconnect calendar, which also syncs with faculty or staff Outlook Exchange calendar.

S&Tconnect Early Alert is replacing the current Academic Alert system used by Missouri S&T. Both S&Tconnect Early Alert and Academic Alert will run in parallel with each other until the end of Fall 2014.

Canvas Stats Digest: First Three Weeks (Aug 21—Sep 11)

USERS – Now that we have a few weeks behind us, we can look back at what the data show us about student Canvas use, and we can begin to see some patterns emerge. For example, on what days do students log in the most?  The answer to that is not surprising–Saturdays are consistently the least busy day on Canvas, with an average of only 2000 users checking in.  Sundays, however, are when at least half of S&T students (about 4000 users or so) actually start the academic week. Usage shoots up in the early part of the week, and by Wednesday the number of active students has climbed to over 7000 users. By Thursday the usage starts to taper downward again.

If Saturday is the nadir of Canvas participation, then Wednesday is the zenith! A quick look at this up-and-down pattern of student usage suggests that Monday or Wednesday may be the optimum day for instructors to post things on Canvas, and that Saturday due dates are likely to be missed by all but the most diligent students.

The most common times for students to be active in Canvas are between the hours of 8AM to 10PM. There are a few hundred night owls up past Midnight, but the number of users drops drastically after 2AM.

 

TECHNOLOGY – Desktop and Laptop computers remain the primary way that students interact with Canvas, as 90% of all sessions in the first three weeks were made on these more “traditional” types of computing devices. Only 10% of sessions were on a mobile device. Of that 10%, only 1.3% were on a tablet computer such as an iPad. That number is interesting–are tablets a passing fad? Have phones surpassed the tablet as a more compact and useful device in general? Perhaps it’s just that tablets are great for passive media consumption, but not as good for content creation like students are tasked with inside of Canvas.

As for browsers, Chrome is still crushing the nearest competition with a monolithic 74% of all sessions. Safari is at 10%, followed by Edge at 7%, Firefox at 5%, and Internet Explorer at a dismal 2% of all sessions.

 

COURSES – Chem 1310 is still in the lead as “Most popular Canvas course” (counted by pageviews), with Freshman Engineering close behind. By sheer enrollment numbers alone, it’s going to be hard to beat these two courses. Mech Eng 1720 rounds out the top three, with Eng Man 1210 and Calc 2 completing the top five.

A surprise addition has recently joined the ranks of “Most popular”, that of Comp Sci 1972, a course on Matlab programming. With only 175 student enrollments, Comp Sci 1972 is punching way above its weight to make it into the top ten most visited pages in Canvas!

 

If you’re interested in more Canvas analytics, keep following us on EdTechConnect!

 

Clicker-Using Faculty: Please Read, This Is Critically Important!

Hello S&T Instructors,

The new TurningPoint 8.2.2 can now be synced with our instance of Canvas. We think this is a positive change that will benefit everyone, but first there is a minor inconvenience to deal with. If you’re using clickers, you MUST re-authorize TurningPoint to access data from Canvas (this is how the new course rosters are populated)!

It’s not hard and will make things easier in the long run. The new TurningPoint Sync tool will automatically update course rosters overnight, meaning you can set your course up and then not worry about it.

Here is how it works:

  1. Go to http://account.turningtechnologies.com and login with your Turning Account.
  2. Under Available Courses, you should see an option for connecting to Canvas. Click the “Connect” button, sign into Canvas with your S&T credentials and then click Authorize.
  3. TurningPoint will load your Available Courses. They MUST be published in order for TP to see them!
  4. Click the “Connect” button under each course you want to add to the Current Courses section.

That’s it! The next time you sign into TurningPoint, you should see your new course rosters! They will automatically update overnight.

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Since you probably have session data from previous sessions, you will want to move them in the Manage tab so that they are associated with the most current list (from TurningPoint Sync).

You will also see your previous course rosters as well as the new course rosters. The new course rosters are marked with a little cloud icon, indicating that they exist on the web (i.e. in the cloud). The old list will be marked with two little people icons. Simply click and drag the sessions from the old roster to the new roster and everything will be properly synced.

Note: You must use TurningPoint version 8.2.2 or above. This version can be downloaded from the Turning Point website or updated from within the older installed version.

 

If you need assistance, please contact EdTech and we’ll be glad to help!

Weekly Canvas Stats Digest: 21Aug—28Aug, Week 1

Users – The first semester of the year started out strong with a steady uptick in Canvas usage actually beginning on Sunday, August 20 when cumulative student usage peaked at 2899 users. By Monday, that number had climbed to 5400 users. Wednesday saw the highest number of users at 7100. Participation then saw a steady decline to a low point of 2200 users on Saturday the 26th. The next day, Sunday the 27th, was a fairly studious one, with a peak cumulative user count of 4300.

Overall, S&T students initiated 63,451 Canvas sessions and racked up 488,422 pageviews over the first week of the Fall 2017 semester. If we average these numbers across the entire site for each day, each student session consisted of about 7 pageviews.

 

Location – 99.9% of student connections to Canvas originated from within the United States. 94% of those student connections were from within the state of Missouri. Students connected to Missouri S&T’s Canvas from every state in the Union except for Montana, Vermont, and Delaware.

There were a small handful of students connecting from outside of the United States. Students from China, Saudi Arabia, Canada, Mexico, France, Belgium, Greece, Japan, and the United Kingdom also connected to S&T’s Canvas, but all of the sessions originating from outside of the US were numbered in the single digits.

 

Courses – The most “popular” Canvas course (as measured by student pageviews) is easily Chemistry 1310, the general Chemistry 1 course, with around 23000 pageviews in the first week. With over 750 enrolled users, it’s not a total surprise that it’s a very busy course!

The second most popular course by student pageviews is the FE 1100 Freshman Engineering course with 7745 pageviews in the first week. After that, it’s Math 1215, Calculus 2 with 3148 pageviews.

Rounding out the rest of the top five is Mech Eng 1720 (Intro to Engineering Design) and Eng Man 1210 (Econ Analysis of Engr Projects) with right around 3000 pageviews each.

 

Technology – In the first week of class, 90.7% of student access to Canvas was on a traditional desktop or laptop computer. 7.9% of student access was via a mobile cellular device, while only 1.4% of student access to Canvas was done on a tablet computer such as an iPad.

Windows is the most popular OS with 77% of sessions being made from a Windows machine. Macintosh machines accounted for 12.8% of sessions. Linux machines represented 0.48% of sessions, and one person even logged into Canvas using their Xbox One!

Chrome is the most popular Browser with 72% of sessions compared to Safari’s 11%. Surprisingly, Edge is more popular than Firefox, with 8% of sessions compared to 5.5%, respectively. Internet Explorer got 1.8% of sessions. The least popular browser, the stock Android Browser, was only used in 0.01% of Canvas sessions.

Mobile device usage was interesting. Literally hundreds of different types of Android-based cellular devices were used to access Canvas, but the Apple iPhone seems to be the most popular single cellular mobile device used, representing 45% of all mobile sessions.

 

Interested in Canvas stats like these? Follow us for more weekly Canvas analytic updates!

FSI Tip: A “One-Minute Message” Engages all Students

To retain students in Engineering, ENGAGE students in Engineering. Retain
undergraduates, particularly underrepresented groups, by improving their
day-to-day classroom and educational experiences. ENGAGE’s free,
research-based resources can help you do this.

Source: www.engageengineering.org

One the statements that I hear a lot is “this topic that I’m studying doesn’t have anything to do with what I’ll be doing when I graduate.” Students sometimes lack the ability to connect what they are learning in the courses they are taking with what they will be doing when they graduate and “get a real job.” See if there are ways that you can relate the topics and lectures that you are giving to real-world applications. This will also help students connect to you, especially when you showcase your research as part of this process.

The Importance of Learning Students’ Names

In a recent study, more than 85% of students said it was important to them that their instructors knew their names. Their reasons were quite convincing.

Source: www.facultyfocus.com

Knowing someone’s name and greeting them by that name when they come in your classroom is a great way to set the tone for the semester. It is the first steps in creating an atmosphere of collegiality. It also shows that as the instructor you are invested in this class because you took the time to learn the students’ names. Sometimes it is the most simple things that can have the most impact. 

TurningPoint Cloud Upgrading to TurningPoint 8.2 for Fall 2017

 

For Fall 2017, Missouri S&T will be transitioning from TurningPoint Cloud (a.k.a. version 7.5) to TurningPoint 8.2, the most recent version.
The results of this transition are as follows. Most of these changes are cosmetic, but there are a few changes in functionality.

  • IMPORTANT: PowerPoint Polling files (i.e. TurningPoint presentations) within TP 8.2 are NOT backwards compatible with TurningPoint Cloud files. When you first open TurningPoint 8.2, you will be prompted to create new versions of the presentations. The original files will still be available.
    • EdTech recommends TurningPoint 8.2 be installed on any computers on which you may be editing TurningPoint presentations.
  • “Participant Lists” are now referred to as “Courses” or “Course Rosters” within TurningPoint.
  • “ResponseWare” is now known as “Mobile Responses.” The ResponseWare app on mobile devices is now simply “TurningPoint.”
  • The Manage tab of the TurningPoint dashboard now has the following buttons:
    • Upload Grades – push the existing grades into Canvas.
    • Update (highly recommended!) – quickly updates any changes to the course roster.
    • Edit Roster (not recommended) – allows instructors to manually make changes to the course roster.
    • Results Manager – same button as before, just moved to a different location.
  • The buttons for PowerPoint Polling, Anywhere Polling, and Self-Paced Polling look different, but function as before.

Students will NOT need to do anything differently in order to ensure their Turning Account is synced with a course. They still need to do the following:

  1. Purchase a Turning Account – this can be done from the S&T store or through the TurningPoint store.
  2. Sync their Turning Account with Canvas – this can be done via the Canvas Help and Resources course in Canvas, in which ALL students are enrolled.
  3. (Optional) Register a Clicker – Students who purchase a clicker will need to also register their device with TurningPoint. This only applies if students are required to purchase a clicker and the Mobile Devices option (formerly know as ResponseWare) is not being used.

Instructors: The server you will connect to is mst.turningtechnologies.com. Questions? Call us.

Educational Technology will be spending a lot of time in the Library during the week before classes start as well as the first week of classes. We’ll be available to help both students and instructors prepare for TurningPoint.
As always, Educational Technology (edtech@mst.edu) will gladly hear any questions, comments, or concerns regarding TurningPoint. We look forward to a smooth transition to the new TurningPoint!

Students Don’t Always Recognize Good Teaching, Study Finds – The Ticker – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Source: www.chronicle.com

The results of this study are not surprising, but confirm what instructors have said for a long time. Many students judge good teaching by how well they succeed in a class rather than the way it was taught. 

TEGRITY Courses Purged at End of Semester – SP 2017

IMPORTANT! Please read the following message VERY carefully!

Educational Technology (EdTech) will be purging ALL course sessions stored in Tegrity at close of business on Friday, May 26, 2017.

Missouri S&T’s usage agreement with Tegrity limits us to only 500 hours of recordings per semester. This means we MUST remove all recordings from Tegrity at the end of each semester in order to ensure we have enough space available for recordings in the next semester.

WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU:

If you used Tegrity lecture capture to record your class sessions, those recordings will be removed permanently from Tegrity’s servers. This includes any recordings in your private course. All Tegrity users are given a private course in addition to their regular courses (listed as “ Private Course” in the course list inside of Tegrity).

If you would like to maintain any recordings (for archival purposes), the link below shows how to download the recordings for storage:

http://edtech.mst.edu/support/tegrity/downloadrecording/

NOTE: In previous semesters, it was possible for instructors and students to “subscribe” to a Tegrity recording as a podcast through iTunes. The current version of Tegrity is apparently having difficulty interfacing properly with the most recent versions of iTunes. This means that iTunes no longer downloads the Tegrity recordings properly.

Any instructor who would like assistance in backing up their Tegrity recordings is strongly encouraged to contact the Help Desk at 573-341-HELP or online at help.mst.edu. EdTech will be glad to provide that assistance.

More information about Tegrity lecture capture can be found at:

http://edtech.mst.edu/support/tegrity/